Talk To Me Johnnie - I have to start the email by thanking you for your awesome programming and sharing your knowledge. So very much appreciated!

What is your stance on saturated fats? Previously, (the last couple months), I have dismissed it as I think a lot of the CrossFit community has as something that shouldn’t be worried about. But after buying The Paleo Diet book I am confused. Cordain writes that sat. Fats should be limited and that the consequences of too much sat fats are undeniable.

It wouldn’t be hard to limit them if I wasn’t trying to gain weight, wasn’t a hard gainer, and could consume milk (lactose intolerant). These all force me to eat a fairly large amount of meat.

Thanks again,

Ryan

SATURATED FATS#1

I contacted a very knowledgeable friend about saturated fats and he stated...

There is no convincing evidence that saturated fat is unhealthy. Interestingly, the body possesses desaturase enzymes that can turn saturated fat into monounsaturated fat. As such, it appears that saturated fat is a superior source of fat due to its stability and versatility. The one fat that is a problem in the diet is the polyunsaturated omega-6 fatty acid called linoleic acid. Food sources of linoleic acid include: corn oil, soy oil, cottonseed oil, grapeseed oil, oats, peanuts and peanut oil, rice bran, safflower oil, sesame seeds and oil, sunflower seeds and oil, walnuts, wheat products, brazil nuts, pine nuts, hemp, pecans, and pistachios. Walnuts are recommended because they have a good omega-3 to omega-6 ratio. However, the omega-3 that is present is alpha-linolenic acid, which, due to its poor conversion to EPA and DHA, simply does not balance the linoleic acid (omega-6).

Attached is a research paper by Ronald Krauss, one of the world's most prominent lipid researchers. Meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies evaluating the association of saturated fat with cardiovascular disease - Siri-Tarion, Sun, Hu & Krauss

Krauss concluded, "A meta-analysis of prospective epidemiologic studies showed that there is no significant evidence for concluding that dietary saturated fat is associated with an increased risk of CHD or CVD. More data are needed to elucidate whether CVD risks are likely to be influenced by the specific nutrients used to replace saturated fat. A meta-analysis of prospective epidemiologic studies showed that there is no significant evidence for concluding that dietary saturated fat is associated with an increased risk of CHD or CVD. More data are needed to elucidate whether CVD risks are likely to be influenced by the specific nutrients used to replace saturated fat."

Our bodies produce about 20 times more cholesterol than we eat in a day. Insulin does not control the cholesterol particle size. Rather, hyperinsulinemia and small dense lipoproteins are correlated. Small dense cholesterol will result from excess carbohydrate, especially fructose, consumption. The increase in large buoyant LDL that is accompanied by increased saturated fat consumption is nothing to of huge concern.

John